4. Excess Weight

Losing Weight

This one goes hand in hand with getting more exercise. After all, exercise can contribute to weight loss. More specifically, exercise can contribute to the loss of body fat; if you’re building muscle, you’ll get heavier, but it will be healthier weight. One of the largest factors in terms of serious illness is obesity. Extra body weight can put a strain on the body’s system, partially due to chronic inflammation. This creates an environment hospitable to various illnesses, such as fatty liver disease. Specifically, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, an excessive buildup of fat in the liver leading to inflammation, may develop.

3. Painkillers

Pain Killer

Aches and pains are common and occur for a variety of reasons, so it makes sense that we would have access to so many painkillers to deal with our aches. However, taking too many painkillers can cause problems more serious than the pain they help to reduce. Just like everything else you eat, painkillers must be processed by the liver. Over-the-counter medicines like acetaminophen (Tylenol) can cause serious damage to the liver, especially when taken in conjunction with alcohol (which is why there are warning labels not to mix the two). Limit painkillers, and avoid them if you’re drinking.

2. Weight Loss Supplements

Weight Loss Supplements

Reading the previous points about getting more exercise and losing weight, you might be feeling overwhelmed. If you’re having trouble controlling what you eat and finding time to exercise, you might be tempted to turn to weight loss supplements to help take some of the load off, literally and figuratively. However, these can also interfere with proper liver function; in fact, some studies have found that even “natural” supplements can contribute to liver toxicity, and may not be terribly effective to begin with. Ultimately, you’re better off finding an exercise regimen that works for you and sticking to it.

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