3. Excessive Showering

Excessive Showering

While obsessive hand washing is frequently recognized as a symptom of OCD, some patients suffer from obsessive showering. As with excessive hand washing, this individual with OCD may spend hours scrubbing, long past the point of getting clean. High levels of anxiety prevent the sufferer from obtaining relief and they may feel unable to convince themselves to leave the shower. Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) is a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy that can help patients react to triggers without performing obsessive behaviors.

2. Obsessive Tanning

Obsessive Tanning

We all know the risks that having that sun-kissed glow can carry: skin cancer, wrinkles, and premature aging. It can be hard to remember to apply sunscreen and it is tempting to return from vacation with golden skin. But some people can find the desire to bronze their skin overwhelming and even addicting. Sunshine actually causes our bodies to release endorphins, which is why being out in the sun can feel so good. A study at Georgetown University showed that UV light from tanning beds also causes the body to release powerful endorphins, which can be addicting for some people.

1. Extreme Plastic Surgery

Plastic Surgery

We are blessed with many tools to aid in the pursuit of retaining a youthful appearance. For some who suffer from body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), it can be hard to know when to stop. BDD is a disorder characterized by an overwhelming obsession with one’s appearance, to the point that it consumes them. A person may become consumed with dissatisfaction with their nose, skin, chest, or other areas. A slight flaw becomes magnified in their mind. Signs of BDD are excessive grooming, excessive surgery, avoidance of or preoccupation with mirrors, and camouflaging or hiding perceived body imperfections. As with other types of OCD, antidepressants or CBT can help.


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