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Here’s Why You Get Cancer, America: A Study

Why You Get Cancer

According to a new report from the American Cancer Society, an organization that issues its cancer prevention and early detections facts and figures analysis every other year, they don’t really have good news for us.

“While some measures of cancer prevention and early detection have improved over time, others have either stabilized or worsened,” said Ann Goding Sauer, the report’s lead author. “The bottom line is that despite improvements in some areas of cancer prevention and early detection, systematic efforts to further reduce the suffering and death from cancer are needed.”

Here are 9 takeaways you need to know from the study:

stop smoking

  1. In 2015, 15% of adults smoked cigarettes–the same amount as the 1970s in some areas and among some population groups
  2. But since 2002, there are far more smokers than current smokers in the United States. 52.8 million versus 36.5 million
  3. We’re eating too much junk: about seven out of every 10 adults in this country are overweight and, of those, 38% are obese. Obesity in women seems to be on the rise while men have tapered off.
  4. It’s worse for young Americans—about 21% of 12 to 19-year-olds are obese. This number has not budged in recent years after tripling between 1976 and 2002.
  5. Only half of all American adults assumed they met the recommended levels of aerobic exercise in 2015. Among high school students, that number drops to an estimated 27%.
  6. And we’re ignoring our greens: only 29% of adults said they had two or more servings of fruit and 16% said they had at least three vegetable servings a day in 2015. Those numbers were virtually the same among teens.
  7. More than half of all high-schoolers said they were sunburnt in the past year, but they’re not using tanning beds as much (down by 14%).
  8. HPV is running rampant because only 52% of girls and 39% of boys have completed two or more doses of the vaccine.
  9. Too many uninsured and immigrant women aren’t having a yearly mammography (69%) or Pap test (39%). And, only about 25% of uninsured people were having their yearly recommended colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy.