Plastic Milk Carton

If you consume the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of calcium each day, you probably have a carton or two of milk in your fridge. While the jug of milk may have a prominent place on your table, you probably don’t spend much time thinking about it. For most of us, gone are the days of the friendly milkman leaving icy cold bottles of fresh milk on our front step. Plastic jugs and cardboard containers have replaced the glass bottles of yesterday. Over the years, milk cartons have not just stored our milk. They have served as drinking vessels in school lunches, alerted us to missing children, and been repurposed for crafting. Here are seven facts you may not know about the plastic milk carton.

7. It Tells You Where Your Milk Came From

Milk Came From

A wise shopper will always check the expiration date on a carton of milk before purchasing. But you may not realize what other information is located right there on the label. Did you know that the code located near the expiration date on your carton tells you how far your milk has traveled? Look for numbers stamped on the carton near the expiration date. They may look something like this: 06-407 or 01-234. Click here to type in your code at Where Is My Milk From? and find out where your milk came from. This will pull up a map and the locations of other nearby dairies as well. Other dairy products such as ice cream, yogurt, cream cheese, and sour cream carry these codes as well.

6. You Should Not Store It in the Refrigerator Door

Refrigerator Door

It can be tempting to keep your milk cartons in the door of your refrigerator for easy access. Some refrigerators come with shelves in the door that are just the perfect dimensions for those milk cartons. Unfortunately, this is not the best place to store your milk. Keep your milk on the interior shelves where it is colder in order to prevent spoiling. Refrigerate milk away from foods with strong odors to keep it from picking up those strong smells.


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