5. Carbon Dioxide

Carbon Dioxide

Mosquitoes are able to sense carbon dioxide up to 160 feet away, so the more you exhale, the more attractive you become. Since humans exhale carbon dioxide through the nose and mouth, mosquitoes are attracted to our heads, which explains why mosquitoes are constantly buzzing around our ears.

4. Heat and Sweat

Heat And Sweat

Mosquitoes have a high sensitivity to the scent of lactic acid, uric acid, ammonia and other compounds that are emitted through our sweat, and are attracted to people who run warmer. According to the Smithsonian, strenuous exercise increases the buildup of lactic acid and heat in the body. Also, genetic factors can influence the amount of uric acid and other substances that are naturally emitted, making it easier for mosquitoes to find certain people.

3. Lively Skin

Lively Skin

Research has shown that the types and amount of bacteria on the skin can play a vital role in attracting mosquitoes. The dermal casing found on our skin is naturally teeming with microscopic life and creates a unique fragrance.

2. Pregnancy

Pregnancy

Women who are pregnant are more likely to attract mosquitoes than women who are not pregnant. A study conducted in Africa found that pregnant women are twice as likely to contract malaria by getting bitten by disease-carrying mosquitoes. Researchers believe that it is due to the increase in carbon dioxide, as pregnant women exhale 21 percent more than non-pregnant women. Also, the abdomens of pregnant women are 1.26 times hotter, further attracting mosquitoes to their warm bodies.

1. Beer

Beer
Related: Hotels and Beg Bugs: How to Stay Pest-Free

Is it the alcohol or the hops? According to a study, researchers found that mosquitoes were significantly more attracted to participants after drinking 12 ounces of beer. The scientists found that it was due to the increased ethanol levels in the participants’ sweat due to the beer.

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