4. Pumpkin

Pumpkin

This colorful fall vegetable is packed with fiber and nutrients such as vitamin A, vitamin B2, vitamin C, and potassium. The antioxidants that give pumpkin its vibrant orange color also protect your body from damage by free radicals. Unfortunately, you may combine this delicious gourd with fattening ingredients like sugar, butter, cream, or flour before consuming. Unless you are enjoying a simple side of roasted pumpkin, you may want to avoid baking too many recipes that include this veggie.

3. Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes another vegetable packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and those wonderfully protective antioxidants. These colorful spuds are filling and nourishing. However, they do have more carbohydrates and sugar than, say, an equal portion of broccoli. To fully benefit from the nutrition benefits of sweet potatoes, avoid pairing them with those Thanksgiving Day accompaniments of brown sugar and marshmallows.

2. Canned Tuna

Tuna

Tuna contains healthy omega-3 fatty acids that are beneficial for lowering cholesterol and preventing heart disease. High in protein, tuna fish makes a great alternative to fatty cuts of red meat. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends adults eat eight ounces of seafood each week. However, there is still discussion over possible high levels of mercury in tuna fish. To decrease your risk of mercury poisoning, eat canned tuna in moderation.

1. Peas

green peas

These little legumes contain vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B6, and magnesium. They contain iron, and the fiber they contain keeps your digestive system running smoothly. However, one cup of peas contains 27 grams of carbohydrates and 8 grams of sugar. You can enjoy the occasional side of green peas or bowl of hearty pea soup. However, be sure to include cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and Brussels sprouts in your diet as well.

Related: 11 Delicious Foods You Should Eat Every Single Day
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