3. Toasted Bread

Toast

When you pop a slice of bread, an English muffin, or a bagel into your toaster, you may be toasting up some acrylamide. Again, the FDA has not determined that the levels of acrylamide in your foods are high enough to cause you harm. But if you are concerned, toast your bread to a light golden color rather than a darker brown hue. To further increase the nutritional value of your toast, use whole grain breads like whole wheat, whole grain, or multi-grain.

2. Coffee

coffee

Your morning cup of joe is another place you may find acrylamide lurking. Studies indicate that the process used to roast coffee beans for coffee may introduce acrylamide. Unfortunately, coffee isn’t coffee unless it begins with roasted beans. A previous ruling by a California judge required coffee shops in that state to post warnings regarding a possible link between coffee and cancer. However, in June 2019, the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment adopted a regulation stating that drinking coffee does not increase the risk of cancer. This means Californians can again enjoy their coffee shop java without fear-inducing warning signs over their heads.

1. Charred Meat

Charred Meat

Grilled or roasted meat may also contain cancer-causing chemicals. These substances, heterocyclic amines (HCAs), can form when meat is cooked at high temperatures. Then, when consumed in large quantities, these chemicals can cause damage to DNA, which may trigger cancer. The National Cancer Institute states that animal studies have suggested a link between HCAs and breast, colon, rectal, and prostate cancers. There are steps you can take to prevent consuming excess HCAs from grilled meat. Remove charred sections from your cuts of meat, keep your grill clean from burned-on meat particles, and grill thinner cuts of meat to reduce cooking time.


Loading...

Comments

Social Sharing